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Result : Searchterm 'Sagittal' found in 2 terms [] and 7 definitions []
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SagittalForum -
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A plane, slice or section of the body cutting from front to back through the sagittal suture of the skull, and continued down through the body in the same direction, dividing it into two parts.
 
Images, Movies, Sliders:
 MRI - Anatomic Imaging of the Foot  Open this link in a new window
    
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 Anatomic MRI of the Knee 1  Open this link in a new window
    
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 Circle of Willis, Time of Flight, MIP  Open this link in a new window
    
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• Related Searches:
    • Spine MRI
    • Lumbar Spine MRI
    • Knee MRI
    • Cervical Spine MRI
    • Breast MRI
 
Further Reading:
  News & More:
Additional oblique MRI improved diagnosis of ACL tears
Friday, 7 June 2013   by www.healio.com    
Searchterm 'Sagittal' was also found in the following services: 
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Radiology  (4) Open this link in a new windowUltrasound  (3) Open this link in a new window
Bilateral Breast Imaging in the Sagittal View with SENSEInfoSheet: - Sequences - 
Intro, 
Overview, 
Types of, 
etc.
 
(BLISS) BLISS is a magnetic resonance imaging technique that provides the measurement of two bilateral volumes in a single acquisition. Localized shimming for each volume improves the fat suppression. BLISS is an imaging sequence for sagittal breast MRI studies with high spatial resolution and short scan time.
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MRI Resources 
Pathology - Service and Support - Mobile MRI Rental - Services and Supplies - Knee MRI - Universities
 
Cervical Spine MRI
 
Cervical spine MRI is a suitable tool in the assessment of all cervical spine (vertebrae C1 - C7) segments (computed tomography (CT) images may be unsatisfactory close to the thoracic spine due to shoulder artifacts). The cervical spine is particularly susceptible to degenerative problems caused by the complex anatomy and its large range of motion.
Advantages of magnetic resonance imaging MRI are the high soft tissue contrast (particularly important in diagnostics of the spinal cord), the ability to display the entire spine in sagittal views and the capacity of 3D visualization. Magnetic resonance myelography is a useful supplement to conventional MRI examinations in the investigation of cervical stenosis. Myelographic sequences result in MR images with high contrast that are similar in appearance to conventional myelograms. Additionally, open MRI studies provide the possibility of weight-bearing MRI scan to evaluate structural positional and kinetic changes of the cervical spine.
Indications of cervical spine MRI scans include the assessment of soft disc herniations, suspicion of disc hernia recurrence after operation, cervical spondylosis, osteophytes, joint arthrosis, spinal canal lesions (tumors, multiple sclerosis, etc.), bone diseases (infection, inflammation, tumoral infiltration) and paravertebral spaces.
State-of-the-art phased array spine coils and high performance MRI machines provide high image quality and short scan time. Imaging protocols for the cervical spine includes sagittal T1 weighted and T2 weighted sequences with 3-4 mm slice thickness and axial slices; usually contiguous from C2 through T1. Additionally, T2 fat suppressed and T1 post contrast images are often useful in spine imaging.
See also Lumbar Spine MRI.
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• View the NEWS results for 'Cervical Spine MRI' (1).Open this link in a new window.
 
Further Reading:
  News & More:
Pre-Op MRI Predicts Outcome of Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy
Wednesday, 19 June 2013   by www.doctorslounge.com    
Imaging Technique for Spinal Cord Injury Shows Promise
Sunday, 22 December 2013   by www.wauwatosanow.com    
In Vivo 3-D Cervical Spine Kinematics Demonstrated
Thursday, 19 May 2011   by www.doctorslounge.com    
MRI Images at a 45-Degree Angle Through The Cervic al Neural Forami na:A Technique For Improved Visualization(.pdf)
2006   by www.painphysicianjournal.com    
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Knee MRI
 
Knee MRI, with its high soft tissue contrast is one of the main imaging tools to depict knee joint pathology. MRI allows accurate imaging of intra-articular structures such as ligaments, cartilage, menisci, bone marrow, synovium, and adjacent soft tissue.
Knee exams require a dedicated extremity coil, providing a homogenous imaging volume and high SNR to ensure best signal coverage. A complete knee MR examination includes for example sagittal and coronal T1 weighted, and proton density weighted pulse sequences +/- fat saturation, or STIR sequences. For high spatial resolution, maximal 4 mm thick slices with at least an in plane resolution of 0.75 mm and small gap are recommended. To depict the anterior cruciate ligament clearly, the sagittal plane has to be rotated 10 - 20° externally (parallel to the medial border of the femoral condyle). Retropatellar cartilage can bee seen for example in axial T2 weighted gradient echo sequences with Fatsat. However, the choice of the pulse sequences is depended of the diagnostic question, the used scanner, and preference of the operator.
Diagnostic quality in knee imaging is possible with field strengths ranging from 0.2 to 3T. With low field strengths more signal averages must be measured, resulting in increased scan times to provide equivalent quality as high field strengths.
More diagnostic information of meniscal tears and chondral defects can be obtained by direct magnetic resonance arthrography, which is done by introducing a dilute solution of gadolinium in saline (1:1000) into the joint capsule. The knee is then scanned in all three planes using T1W sequences with fat suppression. For indirect arthrography, the contrast is given i.v. and similar scans are started 20 min. after injection and exercise of the knee.
Frequent indications of MRI scans in musculoskeletal knee diseases are:
e.g., meniscal degeneration and tears, ligament injuries, osteochondral fractures, osteochondritis dissecans, avascular bone necrosis and rheumatoid arthritis.
See also Imaging of the Extremities and STIR.
 
Images, Movies, Sliders:
 Sagittal Knee MRI Images T1 Weighted  Open this link in a new window
      

 Anatomic MRI of the Knee 2  Open this link in a new window
    
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 Knee MRI Coronal Pd Spir 001  Open this link in a new window
 Sagittal Knee MRI Images STIR  Open this link in a new window
      

 Axial Knee MRI Images T2 Weighted  Open this link in a new window
 Anatomic MRI of the Knee 1  Open this link in a new window
    
SlidersSliders Overview

 
Radiology-tip.comArthrography,  Bone Scintigraphy
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Radiology-tip.comMusculoskeletal and Joint Ultrasound,  Sonography
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• View the DATABASE results for 'Knee MRI' (4).Open this link in a new window


• View the NEWS results for 'Knee MRI' (4).Open this link in a new window.
 
Further Reading:
  Basics:
Musculoskeletal MRI at 3.0 T: Relaxation Times and Image Contrast
Sunday, 1 August 2004   by www.ajronline.org    
Knee, Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries (MRI)
Tuesday, 28 March 2006   by www.emedicine.com    
Empirical evaluation of the inter-relationship of articular elements involved in the pathoanatomy of knee osteoarthritis using Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Friday, 30 October 2009   by 7thspace.com    
  News & More:
Researcher uses MRI to measure joint's geometry and role in severe knee injury
Tuesday, 23 September 2014   by medicalxpress.com    
Abnormalities on MRI predict knee replacement
Monday, 9 March 2015   by medicalxpress.com    
Financial Interest May Motivate Higher Knee MRI Referral
Wednesday, 4 December 2013   by www.doctorslounge.com    
Study: MRI scans of knees can be used for biometric identification
Wednesday, 23 January 2013   by www.wired.co.uk    
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Orientation
 
If available, some graphic aids can be helpful to show image orientations.
1) A graphic icon of the labeled primary axes (A, L, H) with relative lengths given by direction sines and orientation as if viewed from the normal to the image plane can help orient the viewer, both to identify image plane orientation and to indicate possible in plane rotation.
2) Ingraphic prescription of obliques from other images, a sample original image with an overlaid line or set of lines indicating the intersection of the original and oblique image planes can help orient the viewer.
The 3 basic orthogonal slice orientations are:
transversal (T), sagittal (S) and coronal (C).
The basic anatomical directions are:
right(R) to left (L), posterior (P) to anterior (A), and feet (F) to head (H).
A standard display orientation for images in the basic slice orientation is:
1) transverse: A to top of image and L to right,
2) coronal: H to top of image and L to right and
3) sagittal: H to top of image and A to left.
The location in the R/L and P/A directions can be specified relative to the axis of the magnet.
The F/H location can be specified relative to a convenient patient structure.
The orientation of single oblique slices can be specified by rotating a slice in one of the basic orientations toward one of the other two basic orthogonal planes about an axis defined by the intersection of the 2 planes.
Double oblique slices can be specified as the result of tipping a single oblique plane toward the remaining basic orientation plane, about an axis defined by the intersection of the oblique plane and the remaining basic plane. In double oblique angulations, the first rotation is chosen about the vertical image axis and the second about the (new) horizontal axis.
Angles are chosen to have magnitudes less than 90° (for single oblique slices less than 45°); the sign of the angle is taken to be positive when the rotation brings positive axes closer together.
 
Images, Movies, Sliders:
 Brain MRI Sagittal T1 001  Open this link in a new window
    
 Brain MRI Coronal FLAIR 001  Open this link in a new window
    
 Brain MRI Transversal T2 001  Open this link in a new window
 MRI - Anatomic Imaging of the Ankle 2  Open this link in a new window
    
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MRI Resources 
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In 2020 your scanner will probably work with a field strength of :
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