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MRI Scan
 
The definition of a scan is to form an image or an electronic representation. The MRI scan uses magnetic resonance principles to produce extremely detailed pictures of the body tissue without the need for X-ray exposure or other damaging forms of radiation.
MRI scans show structures of the different tissues in the body. The tissue that has the least hydrogen atoms (e.g., bones) appears dark, while the tissue with many hydrogen atoms (e.g., fat) looks bright. The MRI pictures of the brain show details and abnormal structures (brain MRI), for example, tumors, multiple sclerosis lesions, bleedings, or brain tissue that has suffered lack of oxygen after a stroke. A cardiac MRI scan demonstrates the heart as well as blood vessels (cardiovascular imaging) and is used to detect heart defects with e.g., changes in the thickness and infarctions of the muscles around the heart. With MRI scans, nearly all kind of body parts can be tested, for example the joints like knee and shoulder, lumbar, thoracic and cervical spine, the pelvis including fetal MRI, and the soft parts of the body such as the liver, kidneys, and spleen. The MRI procedure includes three to nine imaging sequences and may take up to one hour.
See also Lumbar Spine MRI, MRI Safety and Open MRI.
 
Images, Movies, Sliders:
 Angulation of Cardiac Planes Cine Images of Septal Infarct  Open this link in a new window
      

Courtesy of  Robert R. Edelman

 Normal Fetus  Open this link in a new window
    

Courtesy of  Robert R. Edelman
 MRI - Anatomic Imaging of the Ankle 1  Open this link in a new window
    
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 Anatomic Imaging of the Orbita  Open this link in a new window
      

 
Radiology-tip.comDiagnostic Imaging,  Computed Tomography
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Radiology-tip.comUltrasound Imaging,  Sonography
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• Related Searches:
    • Magnetic Resonance Imaging MRI
    • MRI Procedure
    • Liver Imaging
    • Shoulder MRI
    • MRI History
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Open MRIForum -
related threads
 
Open MRI scanners have been developed for people who are anxious or obese or for examination of small parts of the body, such as the extremities (knee, shoulder). In addition, some systems offer imaging in different positions and sequences of movements. The basic technology of an open MRI machine is similar to that of a traditional MRI device. The major difference for the patient is that instead of lying in a narrow tunnel, the imaging table has more space around the body so that the magnet does not completely surround the person being tested.
Types of constructions:
Semi open high field MRI scanners provide an ultra short bore (tunnel) and widely flared ends. In this type of MRI systems, patients lie with the head in the space outside the bore, if for example the hips are examined.
Open low field MRI machines have often a wide open design, e.g. an open C-arm scanner is shaped like two large discs separated by a large pillar. Patients have an open sided feeling and more space around them allows a wider range of positions.
Advanced open MRI scanners combine the advantages of both, the high field strength, newest gradient technology and wide open design. Even scans of patients in upright, weight-bearing positions are possible (e.g. Upright™ MRI formerly Stand-Up MRI).

Difficulties with a traditional MRI scan include claustrophobia and patient size or, for health related reasons, patients who are not able to receive this type of diagnostic test. The MRI unit is a limited space, and some patients may be too large to fit in a narrow tunnel. In addition, weight limits can restrict the use of some scanners. The open MRI magnet has become the best option for those patients.
All of the highest resolution MRI scanners are tunnels and tend to accentuate the claustrophobic reaction. While patients may find the open MRI scanners easier to tolerate, some machines use a lower field magnet and generates lower image quality or have longer scan time. The better performance of an advanced open MRI scanner allows good image quality caused by the higher signal to noise ratio with maximum patient comfort.
See also Claustrophobia, MRI scan and Knee MRI.
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MRI Resources 
MRI Technician and Technologist Career - Mobile MRI Rental - Homepages - MRI Training Courses - MR Guided Interventions - Contrast Enhanced MRI
 
ContraindicationsForum -
related threadsMRI Resource Directory:
 - Safety -
 
The principal contraindications of the MRI procedure are mostly related to the presence of metallic implants in a patient. The risks of MRI scans increase with the used field strength. In general, implants are becoming increasingly MR safe and an individual evaluation is carried out for each case.


MRI Safety Guidance
Some patients should not be examined in MRI machines, or come closer than the 5 Gauss line to the system.
Absolute Contraindications for the MRI scan:
electronically, magnetically, and mechanically activated implants
ferromagnetic or electronically operated active devices like automatic cardioverter defibrillators
cardiac pacemakers
metallic splinters in the eye
ferromagnetic haemostatic clips in the central nervous system (CNS)
Patients with absolute contraindications should not be examined or only with special MRI safety precautions. Patients with an implanted cardiac pacemaker have been scanned on rare occasions, but pacemakers are generally considered an absolute contraindication. Relative contraindications may pose a relative hazard, and the type and location of an implant should be assessed prior to the MRI examination.
Relative Contraindications for the MRI scan:
cochlear implants
other pacemakers, e.g. for the carotid sinus
insulin pumps and nerve stimulators
lead wires or similar wires (MRI Safety risk)
prosthetic heart valves (in high fields, if dehiscence is suspected)
haemostatic clips (body)
non-ferromagnetic stapedial implants
Osteosynthesis material is usually anchored so well in the patients that no untoward effect will result. Another effect on metal parts in the patient’s body is the heating of these parts through induction. In addition, image quality may be severely degraded. The presence of other metallic implants such as surgical clips etc. should be made known to the MRI operators. Most of these materials are non-magnetic, but if magnetic, they can pose a hazard.
See also MRI safety, Pregnancy, Claustrophobia and Tattoos.

Radiology-tip.comRadiation Safety,  As Low As Reasonably Achievable
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Radiology-tip.comUltrasound Safety
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• View the DATABASE results for 'Contraindications' (11).Open this link in a new window

 
Further Reading:
  Basics:
Newer Heart Devices Safe During MRI
Monday, 23 August 2004   by www.hospimedica.com    
Physics of MRI Safety
   by www.aapm.org    
  News & More:
Modern Implantable Heart Devices Safe For Use In MRI Scans
Wednesday, 16 March 2005   by www.sciencedaily.com    
Searchterm 'MRI scan' was also found in the following services: 
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DeviceForum -
related threadsInfoSheet: - Devices -
Intro, 
Types of Magnets, 
Overview, 
etc.
 
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is based on the magnetic resonance phenomenon, and is used for medical diagnostic imaging since ca. 1977 (see also MRI History).
The first developed MRI devices were constructed as long narrow tunnels. In the meantime the magnets became shorter and wider. In addition to this short bore magnet design, open MRI machines were created. MRI machines with open design have commonly either horizontal or vertical opposite installed magnets and obtain more space and air around the patient during the MRI test.
The basic hardware components of all MRI systems are the magnet, producing a stable and very intense magnetic field, the gradient coils, creating a variable field and radio frequency (RF) coils which are used to transmit energy and to encode spatial positioning. A computer controls the MRI scanning operation and processes the information.
The range of used field strengths for medical imaging is from 0.15 to 3 T. The open MRI magnets have usually field strength in the range 0.2 Tesla to 0.35 Tesla. The higher field MRI devices are commonly solenoid with short bore superconducting magnets, which provide homogeneous fields of high stability.
There are this different types of magnets:
Resistive Magnet
Permanent Magnet
Superconducting Magnet
The majority of superconductive magnets are based on niobium-titanium (NbTi) alloys, which are very reliable and require extremely uniform fields and extreme stability over time, but require a liquid helium cryogenic system to keep the conductors at approximately 4.2 Kelvin (-268.8 Celsius). To maintain this temperature the magnet is enclosed and cooled by a cryogen containing liquid helium (sometimes also nitrogen).
The gradient coils are required to produce a linear variation in field along one direction, and to have high efficiency, low inductance and low resistance, in order to minimize the current requirements and heat deposition. A Maxwell coil usually produces linear variation in field along the z-axis; in the other two axes it is best done using a saddle coil, such as the Golay coil.
The radio frequency coils used to excite the nuclei fall into two main categories; surface coils and volume coils. The essential element for spatial encoding, the gradient coil sub-system of the MRI scanner is responsible for the encoding of specialized contrast such as flow information, diffusion information, and modulation of magnetization for spatial tagging.
An analog to digital converter turns the nuclear magnetic resonance signal to a digital signal. The digital signal is then sent to an image processor for Fourier transformation and the image of the MRI scan is displayed on a monitor.

For Ultrasound Imaging (USI) see Ultrasound Machine at US-TIP.com.

See also the related poll results: 'In 2010 your scanner will probably work with a field strength of' and 'Most outages of your scanning system are caused by failure of'
Radiology-tip.comGamma Camera,  Linear Accelerator
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Radiology-tip.comUltrasound Machine,  Real-Time Scanner
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• View the DATABASE results for 'Device' (141).Open this link in a new window


• View the NEWS results for 'Device' (29).Open this link in a new window.
 
Further Reading:
  Basics:
Linear Collider Final FocusMagnet Construction
   by www.bnl.gov    
  News & More:
Selection Criteria For an MR System
   by dspace.dial.pipex.com    
Searchterm 'MRI scan' was also found in the following services: 
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MRI Procedure
 
The MRI device is located within a specially shielded room (Faraday cage) to avoid outside interference, caused by the use of radio waves very close in frequency to those of ordinary FM radio stations.
The MRI procedure can easily be performed through clothing and bones, but attention must be paid to ferromagnetic items, because they will be attracted from the magnetic field. A hospital gown is appropriate, or the patient should wear clothing without metal fasteners and remove any metallic objects like hairpins, jewelry, eyeglasses, clocks, hearing aids, any removable dental work, lighters, coins etc., not only for MRI safety reasons. Metal in or around the scanned area can also cause errors in the reconstructed images (artifacts). Because the strong magnetic field can displace, or disrupt metallic objects, people with an implanted active device like a cardiac pacemaker cannot be scanned under normal circumstances and should not enter the MRI area.
The MRI machine can look like a short tunnel or has an open MRI design and the magnet does not completely surround the patient. Usually the patient lies on a comfortable motorized table, which slides into the scanner, depending on the MRI device, patients may be also able to sit up. If a contrast agent is to be administered, intravenous access will be placed. A technologist will operate the MRI machine and observe the patient during the examination from an adjacent room. Several sets of images are usually required, each taking some minutes. A typical MRI scan includes three to nine imaging sequences and may take up to one hour. Improved MRI devices with powerful magnets, newer software, and advanced sequences may complete the process in less time and better image quality.
Before and after the most MRI procedures no special preparation, diet, reduced activity, and extra medication is necessary. The magnetic field and radio waves are not felt and no pain is to expect.
Movement can blur MRI images and cause certain artifacts. A possible problem is the claustrophobia that some patients experience from being inside a tunnel-like scanner. If someone is very anxious or has difficulty to lie still, a sedative agent may be given. Earplugs and/or headphones are usually given to the patient to reduce the loud acoustic noise, which the machine produces during normal operation. A technologist observes the patient during the test. Some MRI scanners are equipped with televisions and music to help the examination time pass.
MRI is not a cheap examination, however cost effective by eliminating the need for invasive radiographic procedures, biopsies, and exploratory surgery. MRI scans can also save money while minimizing patient risk and discomfort. For example, MRI can reduce the need for X-ray angiography and myelography, and can eliminate unnecessary diagnostic procedures that miss occult disease.
See also Magnetic Resonance Imaging MRI, Medical Imaging, Cervical Spine MRI, Claustrophobia, MRI Risks and Pregnancy.
For Ultrasound Imaging (USI) see Ultrasound Imaging Procedures at US-TIP.com.

See also the related poll result: 'MRI will have replaced 50% of x-ray exams by'
 
Images, Movies, Sliders:
 Brain MRI Images Axial T2  Open this link in a new window
      

 Circle of Willis, Time of Flight, MIP  Open this link in a new window
    
SlidersSliders Overview

 CE-MRA of the Carotid Arteries  Open this link in a new window
    
SlidersSliders Overview

 Breast MRI Images T2 And T1 Pre - Post Contrast  Open this link in a new window
 Sagittal Knee MRI Images T1 Weighted  Open this link in a new window
      

 
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MRI Resources 
Distributors - Mobile MRI - Stent - Spectroscopy - Intraoperative MRI - Claustrophobia
 
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