UltraSound - Technology Information PortalThursday, 21 February 2019
Info
  Sheets



Out-
      side
 




 
 'Ultrasonic Power' 
SEARCH FOR   
 
  12345ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWZ
Result : Searchterm 'Ultrasonic Power' found in 1 term [] and 6 definitions [], (+ 6 Boolean[] results)
1 - 5 (of 13)     next
Result Pages : [1]  [2]  [3]
Searchterm 'Ultrasonic Power' was also found in the following services: 
spacer
News  (1)  
 
Ultrasonic PowerMRI Resource Directory:<br> - UltraSound Physics -
 
The ultrasonic power is the total amount of sound energy emitted by the transducer per unit of time.
See also Ultrasonic Heating.
spacer
• Related Searches:
    • Range Resolution
    • Reflection
    • Transit Time
    • Zero Offset
    • Echo

 Further Reading:
  Basics:
Physics Tutorial: Ultrasound PhysicsOpen this link in a new window
   by www.physics247.com    
Searchterm 'Ultrasonic Power' was also found in the following service: 
spacer
Radiology  (1) Open this link in a new window
Absorbed DoseMRI Resource Directory:<br> - UltraSound Physics -
 
In physics, the absorbed dose is the ultrasonic power absorbed per unit of mass of an object, and is measured in watts per kilogram (W/kg). The absorption increases with ultrasound intensity and frequency.
The thermal index describes the potential for heating of the patient's tissue due to the application of energy.
See also Thermal Effect, Ultrasound Safety, Ultrasound Regulations.
Radiology-tip.comRadiation Absorbed Dose
spacer
Radiology-tip.comAbsorbed Dose
spacer

 Further Reading:
  Basics:
Physics Tutorial: Ultrasound PhysicsOpen this link in a new window
   by www.physics247.com    
US Resources  
Ultrasound Guided Interventions - Endoscopic - Obstetric - Pregnancy - Equipment and Parts - Universities
 
CavitationMRI Resource Directory:<br> - UltraSound Physics -
 
Cavitation is any activity of highly compressible transient or stable microbubbles of gas and/or vapour, generated by ultrasonic power in the propagation medium. Cavitation can be described as inertial or non-inertial. Inertial cavitation has the most potential to damage tissue and occurs when a gas-filled cavity grows, during pressure rarefaction of the ultrasound pulse, and contracts, during the compression phase. Collapses of bubbles can generate local high temperatures and pressures. Transient cavitation can cause tissue damage.
The threshold for cavitation is high and does not occur at current levels of diagnostic ultrasound. The introduction of contrast agents leads to the formation of microbubbles that potentially provide gas nuclei for cavitation. The use of contrast agents can lower the threshold at which cavitation occurs.

Types of cavitation:
point Acoustic cavitation - sound in liquid can produce bubbles or cavities containing gas or vapour.
point Stable cavitation - steady microbubble oscillation due to the passage of a sound wave.
point Transient cavitation - short-lived cavitation initiated by the negative pressure of the sound wave.
spacer

 Further Reading:
  Basics:
Stone fragmentation by ultrasoundOpen this link in a new window
August 2004   by www.ias.ac.in    
Searchterm 'Ultrasonic Power' was also found in the following services: 
spacer
News  (1)  
 
DecibelMRI Resource Directory:<br> - UltraSound Physics -
 
(dB) A customary logarithmic measure most commonly used (in various ways) for measuring sound. Decibel is a way to express the ratio of two sound intensities: dB=10log10I1/I2 being I1 the reference. If one sound is 1 bel (10 decibel) 'louder' than another, this means the louder sound is 10 times louder than the fainter one. A difference of 20 decibel corresponds to an increase of 10 x 10 or 100 times in intensity.
The intensity of ultrasound decreases during the propagation and is measured in db/cm.
For sound pressure (the pressure exerted by the sound waves) 0 decibel equals 20 microPascal (µPa), and for ultrasonic power 0 decibel sometimes equals 1 picoWatt.
See also dB/dt, Phon, and Logarithms.
spacer

 Further Reading:
  News & More:
Ultrasound in diagnostic and therapyOpen this link in a new window
   by www.anst.uu.se    
Searchterm 'Ultrasonic Power' was also found in the following service: 
spacer
Radiology  (1) Open this link in a new window
History of UltrasoundMRI Resource Directory:<br> - History of UltraSound -
 
point In 1880 the Curie brothers discovered the piezoelectric effect in quartz. Converse piezoelectricity was mathematically deduced from fundamental thermodynamic principles by Lippmann in 1881.
point In 1917, Paul Langevin (France) and his coworkers developed an underwater sonar system (called hydrophone) that uses the piezoelectric effect to detect submarines through echo location.
point In 1935, the first RADAR system was produced by the British physicist Robert Watson-Wat. Also about 1935, developments began with the objective to use ultrasonic power therapeutically, utilizing its heating and disruptive effects on living tissues. In 1936, Siemens markets the first ultrasonic therapeutic machine, the Sonostat.
point Shortly after the World War II, researchers began to explore medical diagnostic capabilities of ultrasound. Karl Theo Dussik (Austria) attempted to locate the cerebral ventricles by measuring the transmission of ultrasound beam through the skull. Other researchers try to use ultrasound to detect gallstones, breast masses, and tumors. These first investigations were performed with A-mode.
point Shortly after the World War II, researchers in Europe, the United States and Japan began to explore medical diagnostic capabilities of ultrasound. Karl Theo Dussik (Austria) attempted to locate the cerebral ventricles by measuring the transmission of ultrasound beam through the skull. Other researchers, e.g. George Ludwig (United States) tried to use ultrasound to detect gallstones, breast masses, and tumors. This first experimentally investigations were performed with A-mode. Ultrasound pioneers contributed innovations and important discoveries, for example the velocity of sound transmission in animal soft tissues with a mean value of 1540 m/sec (still in use today), and determined values of the optimal scanning frequency of the ultrasound transducer.
point In the early 50`s the first B-mode images were obtained. Images were static, without gray-scale information in simple black and white and compound technique. Carl Hellmuth Hertz and Inge Edler (Sweden) made in 1953 the first scan of heart activity. Ian Donald and Colleagues (Scotland) were specialized on obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound research. By continuous development it was possible to study pregnancy and diagnose possible complications.
point After about 1960 two-dimensional compound procedures were developed. The applications in obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound boomed worldwide from the mid 60’s with both, A-scan and B-scan equipment. In the late 60’s B-mode ultrasonography replaced A-mode in wide parts.
point In the 70’s gray scale imaging became available and with progress of computer technique ultrasonic imaging gets better and faster.
point After continuous work, in the 80’s fast realtime B-mode gray-scale imaging was developed. Electronic focusing and duplex flow measurements became popular. A wider range of applications were possible.
point In the 90’s, high resolution scanners with digital beamforming, high transducer frequencies, multi-channel focus and broad-band transducer technology became state of the art. Optimized tissue contrast and improved diagnostic accuracy lead to an important role in breast imaging and cancer detection. Color Doppler and Duplex became available and sensitivity for low flow was continuously improved.
point Actually, machines with advanced ultrasound system performance are equipped with realtime compound imaging, tissue harmonic imaging, contrast harmonic imaging, vascular assessment, matrix array transducers, pulse inversion imaging, 3D and 4D ultrasound with panoramic view.
read more

Radiology-tip.comDiagnostic Imaging
spacer
Radiology-tip.comMRI History
spacer

 Further Reading:
  News & More:
Physics Tutorial: Ultrasound PhysicsOpen this link in a new window
   by www.physics247.com    
A-Mode Area RatioOpen this link in a new window
   by www.wildultrasound.com    
US Resources  
Pediatric - Carotid - Renal - Education - Gynecology - Hospitals
 
Related Searches:
 • Compress
 • Angle of Incidence
 • Depth
 • Half-Value Layer
 • Reject
SEARCH FOR   
 
  12345ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWZ
     1 - 5 (of 13)     next
Result Pages : [1]  [2]  [3]
 Random Page
 
Share This Page
FacebookTwitterLinkedIn

US-TIP    
Community   
User
Pass
Forgot your UserID/Password ?  


Look
      Ups



UltraSound - Technology Information Portal
Member of SoftWays' Medical Imaging Group - MR-TIP • Radiology-TIP • US-TIP • 
Copyright © 2006 - 2018 SoftWays. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Advertising
 [last update: 2015-03-04 09:17:02]